One in six Irish people have never used the Internet according to latest figures from Central Statistics Office

More than 15 per cent of the country claims to have never been on the Internet

From the most popular birthdays to our favourite cars, the research gives a real picture of the Emerald Isle – including Northern Ireland for the first time in four years.

Here’s your guide to Ireland in numbers:

PEOPLE

There were 63,897 births registered in 2016, 2,012 fewer than 2015.

Of these, 23,348 births were registered as being outside marriage, accounting for 36.5 per cent of all births.

October 1 is the most popular birthday – with 191 babies born on average on that date.

The Statistical Yearbook for 2017

The Statistical Yearbook for 2017

Aside from February 29th, the least popular birthdays are December 29, 28, 27, March 17, January 1 and December 23.

There were 22,626 marriages in 2016, 510 more marriages registered than 2015 and includes 1,056 same-sex marriages.

Mums are getting older. Over 65 per cent of the 63,897 births registered in 2016 were to women aged between 30 and 39.

Some 295 children were born in 2016 to mothers aged 45 years and over.

There are more than 1.2 million families in Ireland. The official figure on Census Night was 1,218,370 – a rise of 51 per cent since 1996.

More than a third of children born in Ireland now are to unmarried couples or lone parents

ALAMY
More than a third of children born in Ireland now are to unmarried couples or lone parents

The average number of children per family was 1.38 in 2016 while in 1996 the average number of children per family was 1.82.

The number of people working increased to 2,014,900 in 2016.

The number of unemployed people decreased by 11.1 per cent between 2015 and 2016.

SOCIETY

Dubliners have better internet access. In early 2017, 94 per cent of households in the Dublin region had internet access compared to 83 per cent of households in the Border region.

One in six people has never used the internet, or 16 per cent. Almost half of these were aged 60-75. In contrast, just four per cent of 16-29 year-olds haven’t been online.

Half of those who say they’ve never used the Internet are aged between 60 and 75

Half of those who say they’ve never used the Internet are aged between 60 and 75

More than one third of people aged 15 to 64 years have a third level qualification, 2016 figures show.

Less than one in ten people (8.7 per cent) aged 15 to 64 years have a primary level education only.

There were 188,178 full-time third level students in 2015/16, a 910 per cent increase since 1965/66.

The at risk of poverty rate was 16.9 per cent in 2015, a marginal decrease on the 2014 rate of 17.2 per cent.

The deprivation rate for those at risk of poverty was 51.5 per cent in 2015 compared with a low of 29.1 per cent in 2008.

Irish businesses are second to only Malta in leading the way in using social media to promote themselves

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Irish businesses are second to only Malta in leading the way in using social media to promote themselves

BUSINESS

Irish businesses are the second most likely to use social media in the EU 28.

At 64 per cent, we ranked second only to Malta ranked at 71 per cent. The EU average was 45 per cent.

Car sales are up on last year. The volume of retail sales of motor trades increased by 10.3 per cent.

In 2016, there was an annual increase of 21.8 per cent in the number of new houses built and an annual increase of 39.4 per cent apartments granted planning permissions.

The building boom appears to be returning. Output in total building and construction increased by 18.3 per cent in 2016 when compared to 2015.

However between 2006 and 2016, the volume of output in building and construction had decreased by 66.1 per cent.

In 2014, the business economy in Ireland was worth €516bn and generated €45bn in wages and salaries employing 1,396,096 persons in 238,249 enterprises.

Some 40,150 homes were bought and sold last year, with a combined value of €9.9billion

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Some 40,150 homes were bought and sold last year, with a combined value of €9.9billion

ECONOMY

Average annual earnings were €45,611 for full time employees in 2016 while part time employees earned €16,597 on average.

Most people have a disposable income of €446.55 per week, as of 2015. The typical household has €868.01 to spend.

Some 40,150 homes were bought and sold last year, with a combined value of €9.9bn.

The median value of properties sold nationally in 2016 was €196,000.

Ireland’s total exports for 2016 stand at €335bn. Most exports were to the USA (€63.7bn) followed by the UK with exports of €42.9bn, Germany €23.9bn, China €22.1bn and Belgium €19.6bn.

Our largest trading partner for imports was USA (€47.1bn); imports from the UK were €33.3bn and from Netherlands were €22bn.

The amount owed by households to Irish banks continued to decline in 2016 standing at €88.2bn at year end compared to €92bn in 2015 and a €110.3bn in 2011.

TOURISM AND TRANSPORT

Some 9.6 million tourists visited Ireland last year, an increase of 10.9 per cent. Residents of Great Britain accounted for 3.9 million trips.

Irish people took 7.6 million overseas holidays last year, spending €6.5bn.

Ross Castle on the shores of Lough Leane in County Kerry

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Ross Castle on the shores of Lough Leane in County Kerry

The Guinness Storehouse in Dublin is a popular tourism destination

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The Guinness Storehouse in Dublin is a popular tourism destination

More than two thirds of this cash was splashed in the EU.

Stay-cations are back in vogue.

Irish residents took almost 9.3 million domestic trips in 2016. Total expenditure by Irish residents on domestic trips for 2016 amounted to €1.8 bn.

There were 141,931 new private cars licensed in 2016 – up 17.2 per cent -with Volkswagen the most popular make. This was the highest number of new cars licensed since 2008.

In 2016, 32.7 million passengers passed through Ireland’s five main airports in over 247,000 flights.

Dublin accounted for 82.7 per cent of these (204,600), while Cork handled 8 per cent (19,900).

Only a fraction of Irish farmland is now used to grow studs

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Only a fraction of Irish farmland is now used to grow studs
Source:-Thesun

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